Spocket Review: WooCommerce Dropshipping With US/EU Suppliers

Disclosure: WP Mayor is a professional review site that receives compensation from the companies whose products we review. Each product is thoroughly tested and our honest opinions are shared publicly. We are independently owned and the opinions expressed below are our own. Looking for a way to create a dropshipping store with WordPress and WooCommerce? In our Spocket review, I’ll give you a look at a freemium tool that can help you set up a curated dropshipping store on WooCommerce. What’s most unique about Spocket is that, unlike a lot of other WooCommerce dropshipping plugins that connect you to AliExpress, Spocket focuses on connecting you to suppliers who are located within the United States or Europe. The upshot of that approach is that you’ll be able to offer faster shipping for your customers as compared to other solutions that have to ship from China. Keep reading our Spocket review to see all the features and a hands-on look at how everything works. Spocket Review: What This Tool Does First up, one of the unique things about Spocket is the supplier network. I already told you that most of them are located in the US/EU*, but they’ve also all been vetted by Spocket before being added to the database. So you’re getting curated suppliers who know you’ll be dropshipping. *Not all suppliers are in the US/EU. For example, I found some from Hong Kong. The locations are all clearly marked, though, and you can easily filter by specific locations. Beyond that, Spocket makes it easy to import products from those suppliers to your WooCommerce store. You can do it with the click of a button, and Spocket will handle keeping inventory in sync so that you don’t accidentally sell out of stock products. Finally, once some orders roll in from your WooCommerce store, Spocket also lets you handle order fulfillment with the click of a button. There are no upfront costs – you only pay for fulfillment after you’ve already received the order from WooCommerce (and have the cash in hand). By my using “click of a button” twice in the text above, you should get the idea that the goal here is to make your dropshipping setup as simple and streamlined as possible. Spocket Pricing Spocket offers both free and premium plans. With the free plan, you can have up to 25 unique products and unlimited orders. So if you have a really small store, that might be all you need. After that, there are two premium plans: Pro – $49/month or $348/year for up to 250 products Empire – $99/month or $948/year for unlimited products Both paid plans also give you access to branded invoicing and premium products, which are not available on the free tier. Hands-on With Spocket For the hands-on section of this Spocket review, I’ve already got my basic WooCommerce store ready. Now, I’m going to show you what it’s like to set up and use Spocket for WooCommerce. Once you’ve installed and activated the free Spocket plugin from WordPress.org, you can go to Settings → Spocket to Connect to Spocket and finish the setup process: Then, you’ll need to give Spocket access to your store via the WooCommerce API. These permissions are necessary for Spocket to manage inventory and fulfillment: Then, you can go to the Spocket cloud dashboard, where Spocket will have already created an account for you using your WordPress admin email. Searching For Products To Import To find products that you want to dropship, you’ll use the Spocket web interface. At the top, you get options to search/filter by: Keyword Category Price Location Supplier And you can also browse curated collections below that: For example, let’s say that you want to sell phone cases. A search for “iPhone case” brings back a bunch of matches. For each case, you can see the: Actual price Suggested retail price If you want to see more information about a product, you can click on it to open a popup with extra details. Here, you can see: Product description Supplier information Processing time Shipping time and price to different locations Return policy Product variations You can also order product samples to test things out yourself. And, if you like what you see, you can also import a product to your store. Speaking of… Importing Products To Your Store To import a product to your store, you can click the Add to Import List button on either the main search page, or the individual product popup. Once you’ve added some products, you can go to your Import List to edit the product’s details (if needed). You can edit pretty much everything about a product, down to the image alt text. For example, the Product tab lets you edit the name, WooCommerce category (called the “Collection), tags, etc.: And the Variants tab lets you control all the variants, including the price for each variation. Spocket also makes it very clear what your actual cost is: Once you’re finished making changes, you can click the Push To Store button to send the product(s) to your WooCommerce store. Then, your product(s) will show up in the normal Products tab in WooCommerce: You’ll also be able to see your active products from the Product List area in Spocket: Spocket will automatically sync inventory. So if a product goes out of stock from your supplier, Spocket will make it out of stock at your store so that you don’t sell an out of stock product. At this point, everything happens as if you were running a normal store. That is, shoppers will purchase your dropshipping products just like they would any other WooCommerce product. For example, here’s what the product page from a Spocket product looks like with the default Storefront theme: Managing Orders And Fulfillment Once someone places an order via your WooCommerce store, you’ll have the money right away because it uses the regular WooCommerce payment processing system. Now, you need to fulfill the product via your dropshipping supplier, which Spocket makes super easy. Here, you can see the order for a phone case in my WooCommerce dashboard: Then, that same order will show up in your Spocket dashboard: From there, you can click Checkout to fulfill the order. Spocket will automatically calculate shipping and taxes based on your customer’s details, and you’ll pay with your own credit card. Spocket also lets you add custom notes, and Spocket will also forward any notes that a customer left in WooCommerce to the supplier(s). All in all, it’s about as streamlined as you can get – pretty much all you do is verify the details and click a button. Exploring The Other Spocket Settings Beyond the areas that I showed you above, Spocket also has a separate Settings area where you can configure some defaults for your account. Here, you can configure: Automated Orders – add your credit card for order fulfillment. Branded invoicing – add your own logo and information for the invoice. Global Pricing Rules – set up a percent, multiplier, or fixed markup to apply automatically. You can also automatically make prices $X.99, or apply different markups to different price ranges. For example, here’s what the Global Pricing Rules area looks like: Final Thoughts On Spocket Overall, Spocket makes it really easy to start dropshipping on WooCommerce. The interface is well-designed, and everything worked seamlessly in my experience. For example, when I synced products from Spocket to WooCommerce, they showed up right away, and when I made a test order in WooCommerce, it also quickly showed up in the Spocket interface. Because of how Spocket handles suppliers, you won’t have the raw product selection that you’d get with an AliExpress dropshipping plugin, and the supplier prices do seem to be a bit higher than what I’ve seen on AliExpress. But at the same time, you’re also getting access to local suppliers, so the fulfilment process will be much faster. Additionally, the overall product quality seems to be higher than AliExpress. That is, there’s less wading through junk products (like on AliExpress), and the product images are higher quality than your average AliExpress product. All in all, if you like Spocket’s approach to dropshipping suppliers, I think the rest of the system does a great job of making dropshipping on WooCommerce about as easy as possible. Get Spocket Colin Newcomer Colin Newcomer has been using WordPress for over a decade and is on a quest to test all 58,075 plugins at WordPress.org. Related Topics: Plugin Reviews Tags: Dropshipping, Spocket, woocommerce Consider sharing this post so others can find it: Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on linkedin Share on reddit Share on telegram Share on whatsapp Share on pocket Share on email Join thousands of people receiving real-world, genuine evaluations of WordPress products and services just like this one every week. Email Stay informed for free

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